What can it do?
Lots of things! See the features page for an up-to-date list of the current features. Also, take a look at the screenshots page to see for yourself the kinds of eye candy OGRE can pump out.

Is OGRE A Game Engine?
No. OGRE can be (and indeed has been) used to make games, but OGRE is deliberately designed to provide just a world-class graphics solution; for other features like sound, networking, AI, collision, physics etc, you will need to integrate it with other libraries, something several frameworks have done, and we have a collision / physics reference integration library as an example in our distribution.

Why? Well, one reason is that not everyone who needs a 3D engine wants to make games, so we don't assume that you do - you can use OGRE for games, simulations, business applications, anything at all. Secondly, even within the games industry, requirements can vary widely; for
example a MMORPG will need a very different kind of network library than an FPS, and a flight sim will need a different kind of collision / physics system to fighting game. If OGRE included all these features, we would be enforcing a particular set of libraries on you, with an
inbuilt set of assumed requirements, and that's not good design. Instead, we provide a very integration friendly API and let YOU choose the other libraries, if you want them. Many experiened game developers have expressed their approval of this approach, because there are no
inbuilt constraints. It can be more daunting for newer users who just want to build another FPS-style game, but for those people there are a growing number of existing frameworks using OGRE which provide a complete solution using a given combo of libraries; but it's important
to realise that OGRE itself will always remain separate, flexible enough to be incorporated into any of these. The principle is of collaboration and integration with other libraries, rather than
assimilation of them, a standard tenet of component-based design.

Why should I consider using OGRE (rather than the other zillion 3D engines out there)?
Many other engines, whilst technically impressive, lack the cohesive design and the consistent documentation to allow them to be used effectively. Many of them have long features lists, but have the feel of a bunch of tech demos lashed together with twine, with no clear
vision to hold them together. Like any other software system this becomes their downfall as they become larger. Most other engines are also designed for one particular style of game or demo (e.g.
first-person shooters, terrain roamers).

OGRE is different. OGRE is design-led rather than feature-led. Every feature that goes into OGRE is considered throughly and slotted into the overall design as elegantly as possible and is always fully
documented, meaning that the features which are there always feel part of a cohesive whole. Quality is favoured over quantity, because quantity can come later - quality can never be added in retrospect. OGRE uses sound design principles learned, tried and tested many times
in commercial-grade software - the object-orientation mentioned in it's moniker is just one of those approaches - frequent use of design patterns is another. The core development team is kept deliberately small, and all of its members are veteren software engineers with many
years of real-world experience. Patches are welcomed from community, but they undergo a strict review for both quality and cohesion with the Ogre philosophy before being accepted.

OGRE does not assume what type of game or demo you want to make. It uses a flexible class hierarchy allowing you to design plugins to specialise the scene organisation approach taken to allow you to make any kind of scene you like. Want to render indoor levels fast? Fine, use the BSP/PVS plugin scene manager which has already been written. Want an outdoor landscape? Again, use another plugin scene manager. The rest of the engine continues to function exactly as before.

So the short answer is - if you favour design quality, flexibility and clear documentation, choose OGRE. You know it makes sense. ;)

Is it really free?
The Ogre source is made available under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), which basically means you can use it however you like as long as release the source for changes you make to the core engine if you distribute your product. The source to your application or to new plugins you create does not have to be released (although it would be nice if you did). See the licensing page for full licensing terms.

  • View media
  • View media
  • View media
  • View media
  • View media
  • View media
Post article RSS Related Articles

Is it too late to say happy New Year? Probably, but we’ll do it anyway. Happy New Year, and as 2017 takes its first steps we’re happy to present another update to Thrive: version 0.3.3.

A flashy new GUI, more realistic health and reproduction systems, and the first steps towards evolution are the flagship features, and you can read all about them below, alongside our recent podcasting efforts and plans for 2017.

Release 0.3.3

Thrive 0.3.3 is part refinement and part preparation for the future. We’ve revamped the old GUI and health/reproduction system, and our first tangible forays into evolution pave the way for full systems in future.

New GUI

The most visible change on entering 0.3.3, especially for those who’ve played previous versions, is our fantastic new GUI. This has been a long time coming but, thanks to Oliveriver, it was well worth the wait (a bit like Thrive in a nutshell, hopefully).

The previous GUI was clunky and covered an unnecessary amount of the screen with dead space, tainting the game as a whole and creating quite some criticism. The new version, however, is much sharper and more orderly, sacrificing a faux-organic feel for an interface that actually works. Less of the screen is obstructed and compounds are displayed more intuitively using progress bars (though right now our temporary microbe storage arrangement reduces legibility).

Thanks to Narotiza and braguy.j, we’ve also implemented smart, professional compound and organelle icons. We hope this will make everything more readable, helping amateur and experienced players identify items at a glance. You can read the full discussion on the new GUI, with justification for the various design decisions, here.

Health and Reproduction Systems

Another prominent new feature is the addition of a basic health and reproductive system, created by TheCreator (awesome as ever). Previously, if the player lost health for some reason, it was irrecoverable and that was pretty much the end of that life. Now, however, the player can recover lost health by consuming certain compounds.

Reproduction too has been revamped, now interacting with the health system. Players must collect enough amino acids and glucose to create copies of their organelles, which spawn in their microbe as their microbe goes through the reproductive motions. Eventually your cell will split, allowing you to enter the editor as before. See the full descriptions for both systems here.

Basic NPC Mutations

As a game about evolution, it’s probably time to get some evolution in. Thanks to our newest programmer, crodnu (or his alternate persona, Count Dooku) we now have a simple NPC evolution mechanic. All the old NPC cell templates have been removed, replaced by randomly generated cells which undergo equally random mutations when they reproduce.

We wish to stress this is far from the full CPA (Compounds, Population and Auto-Evo) system the team has envisaged. At the moment there’s no element of balancing – almost all the random cells you encounter will be pretty useless at surviving. Most of our CPA plans are outlined here – though look out for a potential Devblog on the subject in the near future – and the system we’ve planned is far more thorough than what’s now in the game. At least we are officially the open-source evolution game we purport to be now…to some extent.

Miscellaneous Matters

As always, there are a bunch of small features and bug fixes. Alongside work on evolution, crodnu has worked on refactoring some of the engine involving organelle, compound, process and biome tables. So far their only repercussion on gameplay is variations in compound availability between biomes, but they should help devise more efficient systems in future.

Organelles themselves now have weight. The more you have, the slower you’ll move. No more supersonic behemoths unfortunately.

Programmer hhyyrylainen has also worked on what seem to be our eternal Linux compatibility fixes and more engine refactoring under the hood. Montyspud has also helped add random species name generation, although due to recent GUI changes this isn’t shown in the game yet.

Other News

Of course, game development itself isn’t the only thing happening in the Thrive webosphere.

Livestreams and Podcasts

Anybody remember the two podcasts the team produced in 2013 and never followed up on? Nope, neither did we, but somebody somewhere in the team suggested we start podcasting in some capacity again. You may have seen posts on our social media outlets asking for topic suggestions. At first we spoke in private a couple of times to get ourselves into the swing of things, then a few weeks ago we broadcast a Q&A livestream. You can listen to a few of us (Seregon, Oliveriver, TheCreator, Narotiza, crodnu and hhyyrylainen) fumbling about with technical gremlins before answering the audience’s questions below:

If you’re not taken by the idea of watching a two hour video, a member of the community summed it up nicely with this highlight video.

We’re hoping to do similar events semi-regularly providing enough of us are available. Not all will be Q&As and some may be pre-recorded podcasts as before, but we think it’s nice for our fans to know there are actual humans working on this game.

Future Game Features

So what next for the game? We’ve tried a couple of times to come up with a definitive list of planned items, but our open-source nature means sometimes we have to postpone a feature or add a new one whenever someone works on it. At the moment, our best guesses are more optimisation and combat mechanics, the latter adding heaps more fun to a gradually improving gameplay experience.

Community Forums and Discord

The moderators of our community forum recently set out some new rules to create a more pleasant experience for visitors and newcomers. They’ve been incorporated into our FAQ, which we remind all users of the forum is required reading for anyone before they post. In the interests of cultivating some interesting discussion, the developers will be starting occasional threads on intriguing future game features which haven’t been ironed out yet for fans and developers to contribute to together. We’d like to keep those threads more in-depth and professional than some of the content on the community forums, but unlike the development forums not everything discussed has to have relevance to developing the game as it stands now.

On a complementary note, Narotiza recently set up an official Thrive Discord server. If you want to have casual discussions with the Thrive community about topics unrelated to Thrive, we’d prefer from now on if you went there rather than used the forums, in the interests of reducing clutter and creating a more engaging environment for newcomers to Thrive.

Outreach

Finally, we should probably address the last Devblog. Several things meant the planned outreach boom didn’t happen when we wanted, but with the new GUI in place in particular we’re now even more confident in the project’s appeal and are planning to go through with everything we said we would last time. This is part of the reason for a push for a more professional and welcoming atmosphere on the community forums. Expect to start seeing us promoting ourselves around the internet (hopefully for real this time).

Shortly after our last Devblog, we had our first ever proper press coverage thanks to Nicole Pacampara of Kill Screen – you can read the article she wrote on the project here. For the record, we’re still not making Spore 2.

The project is still very much alive, and if everything goes to plan, is only going to get bigger and better. For now, here’s some pretty music courtesy of Oliveriver (who, by the way, has released a portfolio of Thrive music and other compositions to download for free here, including the theme below).

See you all next time, whenever that may be!

Eternal Glory – January Update
Eternal Glory

Eternal Glory – January Update

Eternal Glory

Recently, huge improvements have been made to the project. The animations have been refined and the emotes are now available. Also, a new type of AoE...

Expert mode: Shooter View
Kyball

Expert mode: Shooter View

Kyball

A hidden Expert mode: “Shooter View”, has been introduced to Kyball. Check out the super-turbo video.

Windows 2000, GeForce4 officially supported!
Kyball

Windows 2000, GeForce4 officially supported!

Kyball

Using OGRE and C++ has made Kyball compatible with computers as ancient as one running Windows 2000, GeForce 4 MX, 512MB RAM. Achievement or vanity?

New graphics effects & sale offer extended
Kyball

New graphics effects & sale offer extended

Kyball

New graphics effects, shadows and filters. Sales offer extended. Vote for us on Steam Greenlight!

Add game Games
Full Metal Combat

Full Metal Combat

Turn Based Strategy

Full Metal Combat is a collection of mecha based games that all take part inside the Metalverse. Current focus is on the "FMC: Generals" title which is...

Aggressors

Aggressors

4X

Agressors is a 3D turn-based strategy game with an extensive mod-support. The development is currently focused on mod "Ancient Rome" covering ancient...

Thrive

Thrive

Futuristic Sim

Thrive is a game about the universe - we want to let you play however you want, make whatever you want, and live however you like. Thrive will be a free...

Eternal Glory

Eternal Glory

MOBA

Eternal Glory is a MOBA that emphasizes team play while incorporating RPG elements such as the classic trinity, character customization and a wide variety...

Kyball

Kyball

Arcade

Kyball is the only cure for a world in despair! With natural resources rapidly running out, the planet becomes dangerously unbalanced. The only chance...

Vector Thrust

Vector Thrust

Combat Sim

Fast pace cellshading flying action. Soar the skies as you take on the most vicious enemies above the ground. Experience an airborne adventure in an all...

Torchlight II

Torchlight II

Hack 'n' Slash

The award-winning action RPG is back, bigger and better than ever! Torchlight II takes you once more into the quirky, fast-paced world of bloodthirsty...

Pacific Storm Allies

Pacific Storm Allies

Real Time Strategy

The long-awaited sequel to Pacific Storm; Pacific Storm: Allies expands upon the success of the internationally acclaimed original to deliver an unforgettable...

Shmup God

Shmup God

Arcade

The most awesome shmup ever made. You will bow before this game in awe, if you're a classic shmup fan. I'm not joking, you will worship the game.

Troubleshooter

Troubleshooter

Turn Based Tactics

Troubleshooter is a turn-based tactics, jrpg style story telling PC on-line platform game.

Comments  (0 - 10 of 19)
Forsete
Forsete

This page is awfully devoid of Shrek memes.

Reply Good karma Bad karma+1 vote
Fenimore
Fenimore

Why Not Troll Engine?

Reply Good karma Bad karma+4 votes
TheUnabridgedGamer
TheUnabridgedGamer

Venetica and Garshap...

Seems like this engine hasn't gotten to be in a title to do well by reviewing standards.

Perhaps sometime soon, it'll be used for something that could be the PC equivalant (in success level) of Uncharted 2?

Reply Good karma Bad karma+2 votes
koburamoe
koburamoe

I dont see how those games getting bad reviews is the graphics engine's fault .
They were DECENT games , for cheap prices decent .

Plus this engine is at least free and open source , unlike the others where in unreal engine 3 you need to buy a full license tog et acces to the source code and modify the engine itself .

Pretty decent for the price : FREE and unlimited acces.

Reply Good karma Bad karma+4 votes
Lex1202
Lex1202

Something is wrong with the info. Since version 1.7, the engine is on an MIT license, not GPL

Reply Good karma Bad karma+5 votes
x3nu
x3nu

Umm, I'm not sure I follow. If your asking if there is a game engine with quality to that of gamebryo that's free, that would be no, or at least to my knowledge.

If you want to download Ogre, just go to the site.

Reply Good karma Bad karma+2 votes
J.Sheppard
J.Sheppard

The fact that the Ogre software ties into "speed tree" is also helpful it aids us when placing and designing our forested maps that would take a year to complete if you were doing it individually.

Reply Good karma Bad karma+2 votes
x3nu
x3nu

Great engine, i've been testing it and it is capable of producing some decent graphics. Much better than irrlicht or any other open source engine out there.

Reply Good karma Bad karma+2 votes
Mejikojin
Mejikojin

How did you download and do you know any easy to use engine with the same level desing as gambryo thats free to download

Reply Good karma Bad karma+4 votes
TheOneandOnly
TheOneandOnly

Looks like a very promising graphics solution for any 3D project; remarkably quick tech support from the developers too!

Reply Good karma Bad karma+2 votes
Post a comment
Sign in or join with:

Only registered members can share their thoughts. So come on! Join the community today (totally free - or sign in with your social account on the right) and join in the conversation.

Follow Report Profile
Platforms
Windows, Mac, Linux
Company
Ogre Team
Contact
Send Message
Homepage
Ogre3d.org
Licence
MIT
Release date
Engine watch
Follow
Share
Community Rating

Average

9

30 votes submitted.

You Say

-

Ratings closed.

Embed Buttons
Link to Ogre Engine by selecting a button and using the embed code provided more...
Ogre Engine
Statistics
Rank
109 of 862
Last Update
Watchers
210 members
Games
80
Files
126
Articles
510
Reviews
5
You may also like
3D Rad
3D Rad BSD
M.U.G.E.N
M.U.G.E.N GPL
GameMaker: Studio
GameMaker: Studio Commercial
ZDoom
ZDoom Public Domain
Unreal Engine 4
Unreal Engine 4 Commercial
Ogre Engine
Ogre Engine MIT