In Lament, you take the role of Michael Anderson, a researcher and archaeologist living in London, 1845.

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Hotel (OUTDATED)
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Yldrania
Yldrania Mar 17 2014, 5:52pm says:

Good job :)

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Landvaettr
Landvaettr Mar 18 2014, 8:00pm says:

GREAT job concerning the light & ambiance inside the room! However you should consider moving the source of the light, the middle section of the window shouldn't be that exposed to light since light's supposed to come from the outside, right?

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CraackerTraash Author
CraackerTraash Mar 19 2014, 5:57pm replied:

I'm not entirely certain what you mean. There are two spotlights coming from that window, one of which is meant as direct sunlight shining through the window using a gobo (though you can't see it in the screen, it's over behind the bed), while the other is meant to simulate refracted light through the glass with a high fov, and is significantly dimmer (it's the one lighting the majority of the room). Both spotlights are positioned in the center of the window for the sake of specular, normal-map, and shadow accuracy.

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Landvaettr
Landvaettr Mar 20 2014, 5:00pm replied:

To be fairly honest I didn't entirely get what you mean either as I don't have the map opened in the level editor in front of my eyes. I just meant the center of the window looks saturated with light from the inside of the room.

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CraackerTraash Author
CraackerTraash Mar 20 2014, 5:10pm replied:

Ah, that makes much more sense. Probably because there's a couple halos and a point light there. Really nothing I can do about it without making the halos impossible to see and/or the point light unrealistically dim. I'll see what I can do, though.

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Landvaettr
Landvaettr Mar 20 2014, 5:26pm replied:

Maybe you could try keeping the halos but removing the point light (it's the pointlight that produces sucha reflection of light on the center of the window), then use a boxlight instead, place the boxlight middle behind the window but let the edge of the box cover up the glass of the window, this way you obtain lightened glasses while keeping a dark frame. I don't know if you see what I mean explaining something as tricky is just awfully hard... :/

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CraackerTraash Author
CraackerTraash Mar 20 2014, 6:31pm replied:

I see what you're getting at, but it's not the glass that I want lit. It's hard to explain exactly why the point light HAS to be there, but to put it simply, it's just a matter of realism. Were I to remove the point light, the window, and the area around it, would not be lit at all, leaving only the spotlight and giving it a very unrealistic look. What I have done since reading your comment, however, is split the one point light into four smaller, dimmer ones, and spread them apart so that the light isn't focused on the center of the window, but rather spread out and more diffuse. I think it looks much better that way.

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Landvaettr
Landvaettr Mar 20 2014, 6:53pm says:

Actually I tried it myself after sending the comment and yes it's defently better to keep the spotlight but using the boxlight allows to put the spotlight farther from the window so it stills slightly lightens the window frame and the room but doesn't oversaturate the frame of the window. and the boxlight makes sure the glasses are lightened and that light seem to emanate from the outside. But your way probably works as well :)

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Description

Old as hell version of Michael's room. Leaving it here for comparison purposes.

You don't even want to know what the original looked like.

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Promotional
Date
Mar 17th, 2014
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