Vader91

The Voice of the Lowlands, joined Feb 8, 2010

I love to study warfare and history in general, play with LEGOs, watch almost anything Sci-Fi, and experiment with various mods. I am a board game designer in spare time, when I'm not recording/editing the Matt & Zach Show or doing stuff with the gaming makeshift clan known as JSSG. My main project right now is March of the Reds; a strategy/tactical card game based on what would happen if the Cold War went hot in 1989. Also, Please refrain from profanity on my page, thank you! If you see a "Vadronus Prime" running around, that's my alternate gamer-tag. (Long version of Vader91 really) The Free Voice from Vegas Itself!

Report article RSS Feed A Generation Behind

Posted by Vader91 on Apr 21st, 2012

In the high-technology, left-winged, similar thought process world that is the 21st
century, I do have to say I am an oddity. Not really an oddity in terms of
size, shape, language, or strength, but an oddity in thought. Others see my
thoughts and opinions as old, outdated, and harsher than those of the common
student. Why do I have this brain that calls the world messed up? Why does it
say that “these kids don't know anything about life around them?” Why are my
writings considered similar to that of an older man? I think I know the cause,
my Grandfather.

            Unlike other children who were raised by a standard family unit of a mother, father,
and siblings, I was raised with Grandparents and my Mother. My parents got
divorced while I was at an incredibly young age, so me and my mother moved in
with my grandparents. We stayed this way for years. To me, my “father” was my
Grandfather, “mother” my Grandmother, and my actual Mother felt more like a
very older sister. My mother worked as a nurse during the graveyard shift at a
children's hospital, so thereby I didn't see her too often between work and
sleep. I was at home with my Grandmother mostly throughout the day, until
Grandpa walked through the door at 6 o' clock sharp every evening. One could
easily see this as a typical family, with a bit of age and generation
modifications.

             It is common knowledge that young boys
typically look toward their father for advice. Now, around the late 1990s and early
2000s when I was raised, a typical father would have ideals and experiences
relevant to their generation, IE late 70s and 80s. His stories would be focused
around events like the space shuttle program, early video games, and the fall
of the USSR. Well, my “father” was raised in the late 50s and 60s. His memories
include things like Vietnam, Civil Rights, and the Apollo programs. It's clear
there's a bit of a gap between my evening tales of adventure and the kid next
door.

            It is known that over time, America as a country has changed. In the early days of
small towns and post-war economy, children and teenagers had to mature early
and get a job young in order to be successful. They also had a slightly more
relaxed free time. Law enforcement was lighter and kids could do many things
like go out shooting next door or have a 100 mile per hour drive in the outer
parts of town. However with urbanization and increase in life expectancy,
younger kids don't need to know so much about life right off the bat, they have
a more relaxed lifestyle in terms of education. However they have lost the
ability to do some activities that the last generation enjoyed. For example,
discharging a firearm near any sort of civilization (which is more widespread
thanks to urbanization) is seen as a felony. Instead, the newer generations
have gone to more electronic forms of entertainment such as arcades and a
larger film industry.

            So, when it came to quality time with my “father,” we did things he did when he was
young. Instead of buying some sort of game system, he taught me how to play
chess. He also believed that early life skills and knowledge were still needed,
and maturing should be quick. He believed that I needed to know a wide
assortment of topics that most others get to in middle or high school, if at
all. He taught me to “man-up” in most situations and watch for myself.
Also being retired a retired submariner, I got more than a handful of
questionably-appropriate sea tales with a side of technical knowledge.

            When I entered a more public world with schooling, a generation gap could be easily
felt.  While most kids knew all 100-some
odd pokemon by heart, I knew how to hold and fire an older BB rifle. During
middle school when most kids barely knew basic mathematics, I already had basic
knowledge of how nuclear reactors function. My sense of maturity and
self-dependence led me to be slightly awkward in the social circle as well.
While most kids were focusing on trivial things like some attractive female or
some new video game coming out, I focus on getting work done. Personally,
though some see this awkwardness as a downside, I see this rough and early
maturity and knowledge as a positive. If need be, I could go out in the world
and roughly know how to make things work. Most teenagers today have a hard time
getting out from behind the Playstation and into the world.

Post comment Comments
Vader91
Vader91 Apr 21 2012, 7:13pm says: Online

This was an essay I wrote for English class earlier this year. Figured some essays like these explain a bit about me, and people like my writing style.

If people like this I may upload more, or I may upload some creative writing (stories) I have done, like this short tale here:

It was yet another hot day in the small desert town of Dustbowl, New Mexico. Two bands of mercenaries have been constantly engaging each other in the area for the past week. An Australian man was hired by a powerful corporation as a marksman. His mission was simple, assist the others in this group to take control of an area a rival corporation was using as a launch area for nuclear missiles. Through his scope, he saw a younger lad guarding one of the building entrances. While he lined up his sights he could see that the boy, probably a scout for the enemy, was reaching for a handgun. The Sniper knew his job well, and a quick squeeze of the trigger removed one more threat from the battlefield.

+1 vote     reply to comment
MattmanDude
MattmanDude Apr 21 2012, 7:39pm replied:

Nice mini-story.

Also loved the essay. Upload more! :D

+1 vote     reply to comment
Vader91
Vader91 Apr 21 2012, 8:01pm replied: Online +1 vote     reply to comment
purplekirby54
purplekirby54 Jul 13 2012, 1:45am says:

Wow.
Sometimes I just come back to this page in the wee hours of the morning and think to myself.

Is there really a method to where I want to go in life?
Do I really want to (poorly attempt) to make my living as a Team Fortress 2 Administrator for a trading server?
Is there really a better world out there in the forests and lakes where a guy can just be free, chop down trees, and be a man?

Is there really more to life
than life?

Then I think to myself, Jeez, Kirby, lay off the soda.

+2 votes     reply to comment
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