For all programmers who are skilled in C-style languages, and beginners who fish for new experience with these!

* * *

Introduction to Programming Using Java, Sixth Edition: Math.hws.edu
C++ tutorial Cplusplus.com and C++ reference Cplusplus.com

Image RSS Feed Latest Screens
Evolution Take one, final solution. Networking using Stratus and NetStreams Networking using Stratus and NetStreams
Articles RSS Feed Latest Articles
Heartbleed Bug Explained
Game

Heartbleed Bug Explained

Apr 21, 2014 News 4 comments

The article explains the concept behind the notorious OpenSSL bug dubbed Heartbleed.

More Progress, and a Delay
Portal 2

More Progress, and a Delay

Jan 10, 2012 Backstock News 1 comment

We've pushed back the release date, but are still working hard....

Progress Update
Portal 2

Progress Update

Oct 18, 2011 Backstock News 3 comments

Portal 2: Back-Stock has come a long way, and its going to go much farther.

Modifying weapons (on Ubuntu)
M.A.R.S. - A Ridiculous Shooter

Modifying weapons (on Ubuntu)

Apr 20, 2011 M.A.R.S. - A Ridiculous Shooter Tutorial 0 comments

Modification of M.A.R.S. weapons - a simple tutorial.

Building your own M.A.R.S. version on Ubuntu
M.A.R.S. - A Ridiculous Shooter

Building your own M.A.R.S. version on Ubuntu

Apr 20, 2011 M.A.R.S. - A Ridiculous Shooter Tutorial 0 comments

How to quickly build M.A.R.S. on Ubuntu distribution?

Post comment Comments  (0 - 10 of 17)
atsebak
atsebak Aug 20 2012, 10:11pm says:

i only use C for embedded systems

+2 votes     reply to comment
lalorobot
lalorobot Jul 8 2012, 6:59pm says:

Also a little login program ;D
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <windows.h>

int main()
{
system("cls");
HANDLE consoleHandle = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
SetConsoleTextAttribute(consoleHandle, 10);
char username[11] = "programmer";
char usernameUI[11];
char password[8] = "ciscool";
char passwordUI[8];
Start:
printf("Username: ");
scanf("%s", usernameUI);
putchar('\n');
printf("Password: ");
scanf("%s", passwordUI);
putchar('\n');
printf("Checking please wait..........\n");
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
putchar('\n');
if(strcmp (username, usernameUI) == 0)
{
if(strcmp (password, passwordUI) == 0)
{
printf("You have been loged in succsesfully\n");
}
else
{
printf("Password or username are wrong\n");
goto Start;
}
}
else
{
printf("Password or username are wrong\n");
goto Start;
}
SetConsoleTextAttribute(consoleHandle, 7);
return 0;
}

note if you are going to try to compile this on linux or mac remove this:
#include <windows.h>
HANDLE consoleHandle = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
SetConsoleTextAttribute(consoleHandle, 10);
SetConsoleTextAttribute(consoleHandle, 7);

+3 votes     reply to comment
lalorobot
lalorobot Jul 8 2012, 6:44pm says:

Hello I just joined this group and for all the starters check this page these are the best tutorials I have found: wibit.net

+2 votes     reply to comment
jdot
jdot Aug 9 2011, 11:22pm says:

hey guys whats up! I like the group - looks really cool. So the groups curly brackets inspired me to post my favorite for loop, who can tell me what its famous output is? (b = 1, a = 0)
for(i = 0; i < range; i++) {
printf("%d\n", b );
b = a + b;
a = b - a;
}

+2 votes     reply to comment
moci
moci Aug 26 2011, 12:30pm replied: +3 votes     reply to comment
moci
moci May 5 2011, 6:04pm says:

ping

+2 votes     reply to comment
Metalspy
Metalspy Jan 4 2011, 9:23am says:

Hey guys, I'm learning C++ (and C#), but one of the main problems I'm running into is the structuring of my programs/games. The 'layout' so to speak. Are there articles or books that can help me out or is it a matter of just coding a lot and learning by making mistakes and rewriting programs?

+2 votes     reply to comment
moci
moci Feb 22 2011, 6:36pm replied:

I'm not sure what you are talking about so I'll just guess.

The problem of splitting up your project into different problems can be a bit tricky, one of the first things you should really learn is OOP (object oriented programming). And no, it's not because u are working with classes that you're doing a good job at OOP.

Another thing you should check out, but only after really understanding the concepts behind OOP, are patterns.

A quick google should give you lots of information on both topics.

+2 votes     reply to comment
Metalspy
Metalspy Mar 10 2011, 8:46pm replied:

Yeah that sounds helpful. I'm getting quite familiar with OOP now, I might check out those (design?) patterns :)

+2 votes     reply to comment
moci
moci Mar 11 2011, 7:37am replied:

Howdy,

Yes "design patterns" because they help you in designing your code. A great book you could read is this one: Oreilly.com - it's in Java but still a pretty good read.

And this book is one of those that started it all: Amazon.com

Good luck with this, but don't get lost in patterns and try to apply them to everything. Practice makes perfect I guess.

+2 votes     reply to comment
Post a Comment
click to sign in

You are not logged in, your comment will be anonymous unless you join the community today (totally free - or sign in with your social account on the right) which we encourage all contributors to do.

2000 characters limit; HTML formatting and smileys are not supported - text only

Established
Jul 20, 2010
Privacy
Public
Subscription
Open to all members
Contact
Send Message
Email
Members Only
Membership
Join this group
Group Watch
Track this group
Share
Embed Buttons

Promote Curly Bracket Programming Realm on your homepage or blog by selecting a button and using the HTML code provided (more).

Curly Bracket Programming Realm
Curly Bracket Programming Realm
Statistics
Members
74
Rank
1,923 of 16,354
Watchers
14 members
Files
2
News
4
Tutorials
8