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Jun 30 2013, 2:12am Anchor

So, I am still planning out my video game. I am designing it. What I suffer from is making the levels bland. Do any of you guys know how to plan out a level layout on paper so I will get the feel of what I want? How do you make good level layouts? Like for linear or open ended games. Mostly linear.

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nanashinemo
nanashinemo Mistress of Magma
Jul 5 2013, 7:42am Anchor

One way to do this is to come up with a list of quirks that fit the theme and use a random number generator to pick one for you. This will help you to put flavour elements into your levels. Random number generation can help you decide on quite a few ways to keep levels 'fresh' and keep players hooked. As for planning out on paper, close your eyes and freehand for a couple seconds, and you've got one edge/wall to use, then structure that level around that.

I'm not great at giving advice, but I hope this helps.

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Jul 5 2013, 12:05pm Anchor

It's difficult to give advice on making more memorable maps for a game in a genre with some mechanics and a linear or open progression.
Step 1. Know the game, Know the assets, Know the mechanics.
Happened upon this article and came to share: Worldofleveldesign.com

Jul 12 2013, 6:37pm Anchor

Well, it's a multigenre game. Like Tron but with more variety.T There are shooter stages and platformer stages. Those are the stages I am focusing on. The rest are like racing sports and puzzles. But here is a question that begs. How does one choose linear or open ended?

Nov 7 2013, 12:13pm Anchor

When creating a level you have to first think of the things that you want to experience through it. Loneliness? Surprise? Rush? Then apply these things into the design. Then think of the pacing, how much time do I want the player to take between these experiences? How long should these experiences last? Then apply this to the design. The think of how you let the player be engaged with the game between these experiences, Should I add verticality here? jumps? traps? enemies? And finally think of the focus points that guide and position the player in the map, a bonfire in a forest, a statue in the city, etc.

Hope this helped :)

Nov 8 2013, 7:28pm Anchor
Kikitoso wrote:When creating a level you have to first think of the things that you want to experience through it. Loneliness? Surprise? Rush? Then apply these things into the design. Then think of the pacing, how much time do I want the player to take between these experiences? How long should these experiences last? Then apply this to the design. The think of how you let the player be engaged with the game between these experiences, Should I add verticality here? jumps? traps? enemies? And finally think of the focus points that guide and position the player in the map, a bonfire in a forest, a statue in the city, etc.

Hope this helped :)


 Oh it Helps,  thanks. I played a game with out atmosphere. It sucked. Oh one other thing. How did you make a map outline?

SinKing
SinKing bumps me thread
Nov 9 2013, 9:32am Anchor

On paper - you stash them. The nice thing about designing on paper is you can put another paper on top of it and get, let's say "Ground Floor" on your first and "First Floor" on your top paper. So you can plan out rooms, exits and elevators, etc. on top of each other. Breaking with the symmetry of making every floor a mirror image of the one below it is important.

Variation is important, especially in linear games. Think about the goal for your character and find as many ways as needed/possible to obstruct him from reaching his goal. Add "helpers" to let him reach places otherwise impossible to get to. Break up environments with Decals and Props. If you have to run through identical corridors it's really boring and can get confusing. Small details and variation where possible, keep the player entertained and interested. These don't always have to be visual cues; sounds and FX work as well when placed fittingly.

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