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Welcome to our second preview. It took a little longer then we hoped because the new horse models were still in production, but now they're finally done, so we present to you: the Napoleonic Cavalry Preview. The Borodino Pack release is still scheduled for late August. CAVALRY IN NTW2 Cavalry in

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Welcome to our second preview. It took a little longer then we hoped because the new horse models were still in production, but now they're finally done, so we present to you: the Napoleonic Cavalry Preview.

The Borodino Pack release is still scheduled for late August.

[size=3]CAVALRY IN NTW2[/size]

Cavalry in NTW2 is powerful, but only if used in a proper fashion. A small miscalculation can reduce your proud and magnificent cavalry corps to a heap of horse meat.

There is quite a large variety of units available, which can be split into light and heavy cavalry. The light cavalry uses fast moving horses, and are ideally used in quick charges to override exposed skirmishers or weakened units, or to make flanking attacks with support of the infantry or heavy cavalry. The heavy cavalry is slower, and are mainly a shock unit, that can pin the enemy down and hold out until the infantry can get close enough, or for faster cavalry to ride around the enemy's flanks and strike them in the back.

Generally a fresh infantry unit can deal with any cavalry unit if it charges head-on. Especially when capable of firing a close range volley they enemy cavalry can be routed in a few instances. But a massive charge of cavalry, supported by musket and artillery fire can overrun have a serious impact on enemy morale. Good use of Officer units (more into those in the next preview) can be vital for both the cavalry and the defenders dealing with them.

Infantry units are packed together much tighter then cavalry units, the result being that there are almost 2 infantrymen fighting 1 horsemen in a duel between the two. Against light infantry deployed in loose formation, the cavalry does not have this weakness, thus making cavalry effective against skirmishing infantry.

[size=3]FRENCH CAVALRY[/size]

"I considered our (British) cavalry so inferior to the French from the want of order, that although I considered one squadron a match for two French, I didn't like to see four British opposed to four French: and as the numbers increased and order, of course, became more necessary I was the more unwilling to risk our men without having a superiority in numbers." -The Duke of Wellington

It took some time before the French cavalry reached its full potential, as it had suffered the loss of many officers during the Revolutionary period. In the cavalry served more nobles than in any other branch of the army, the majority of the aristocratic officers left France during the French Revolution and the overall quality of French cavalry had fallen badly. Napoleon rebuild the cavalry from scratch, his cavalrymen were intensively trained especially in massed tactics, supplied with splendid uniforms and horses and armed to teeth. They were enthusiastic and ready to fight. The officers and NCO`s were battle hardened veterans. After the defeat of Austria and Prussia the excellent German horse depots were captured, so by 1807 French cavalry was reaching its prime. Until 1812 the French cavalrymen were victorious over everyone they encountered on any level above a regiment. At Borodino they even captured a redoubt, a feat never repeated by any other cavalry. It is estimated that 175.000 excellent horses of cavalry and artillery were lost in 1812 in Russia, shortages of trained cavalrymen, officers, NCO`s and war horses were so bad the French cavalry never recovered afterwards.

Mounted Chasseurs

The Chasseurs ? Cheval are the most basic - and weakest - of all current cavalry units. They lack the high morale and ?lan of the hussars, and don't nearly pack enough punch to fight solid bodies of infantry. They are however fairly cheap, and can make an excellent addition to your army if they are used to support superior units, making flank attacks or harassing skirmishers.

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The French Chasseurs ? Ch?val (which means 'on horseback') are usually brigaded with the French hussars. Many of the recruits were foreigners, mostly Belgians or Germans, and are light/line cavalry armed with carbines, bayonets and slightly curved sabres. French Chasseurs are trained for rapid action, capable of raiding, skirmishing, and reconnaissance duties like the hussars. They were capable of charging enemy lines in support and could be used in dismounting actions like dragoons. Many of them are known to be reckless bravado's. They were generally not held in high esteem by many of their French counterparts, especially the hussars. Historically early in Napoleon's campaigns they were armed with two types of sabres: ? la husarde and ? la chasseur. Both weapons were replaced by light cavalry sabre Pattern XI. The bayonets were disliked by the French Chasseurs, they were used as tools, for digging up potatoes for an example, and then thrown away. The French Chasseurs were the only cavalry branch that accepted many foreigners to serve in their ranks, six regiments of French Chasseurs were formed of foreigners.

Hussars

Hussars are very capable light cavalrymen riding fast horses. They have a good morale and are best at performing flanking manoeuvres or striking against vulnerable enemy units. They lack the charge power of lancers and heavier cavalry, so they aren't that good at attacking solid bodies of infantry and cavalry, but can still hold their own for a while.

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The French (and any other hussar in Europe) was modelled on the famous Hungarian hussars. By 1811 there were 11 Hussar regiments in the French cavalry arm. During a parade the sight of the hussars would the women?s hearts made wildly pounding. In combat they rode yelling most unearthly, cursing and brandishing their weapons. They had their own code - that of reckless courage that bordered on a death wish. The hussars were the eyes, ears and ? egos of the army. The mutually supporting camaraderie of the hussars was important factor of their "esprit de corps". Tactically they were used as scouts and screen for other troops and due to their combativeness were also used in pitched battles. It was not a rare sight to see a hussar in a forefront of a hack-and-slash melee, gripping his reins with his teeth, a pistol in one hand and sabre in the other. They considered himself as better horseman and swordsman than everybody else. Bragging, smoking a pipe, drinking, and duelling - these were their funs. There was a saying: "The hussars were loved by every wife and hated by every husband". The hussar was armed with pistols and curved sabre. Some had carbines. The hussars were the most flamboyantly dressed part of every army. Their brilliant uniforms exemplified the panache with which they lived and fought.

Lancers

Lancers are light/medium cavalry armed with a lance (surprise). This gives them a powerful charge with a good chance of killing their first opponent on impact. After the charge they switch to swords for close combat, but the time to do so makes them slightly vulnerable after the initial charge. Therefor they are best used against weakened or wavering enemies that can be routed by the sheer power of their charge.

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Napoleon, wanting to oppose the Cossacks who were nimble, tough warriors before the Russian campaign created the Chevaux-L?gers Lanciers or French Lancers from the 29e Regiment des Dragons. They were Frenchmen trained by Vistula and Polish Guard lancers. They are armed with the lance, Poland's national weapon, but retained the Dragoon styled uniform and helmet. Even though this unit contained mostly raw recruits and newly commissioned officers mounted on barely trained horses, they were led by exceptional senior officers. One such officer, a Colonel Perquit said that, "he didn't recognise any danger." The French Lancers were considered rather tough, disciplined fighters, and just like their Polish comrades they gave no quarter to the enemy. Historically Napoleon converted one chasseur regiment along with 6 dragoon regiments to lancers by 1811. Although the light cavalry could stand in line and fight as battle cavalry, its best purposes were reconnaissance, screening, raiding, pursuit, and field security. The light cavalry manoeuvre units were intended to be broken into small tactical units for use as pickets and vedettes, and for deployment in reconnaissance roles.

Dragoons

Dragoons are a sort of hybrid between light and heavy cavalry. They are capable of performing the tasks of both classes, but not as good as the true versions. They make up a good and affordable all-purpose cavalry arm.

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In 1804 Napoleon had 30 dragoon regiments and were the largest cavalry class, something between light and heavy cavalry. They were trained in infantry and cavalry duties, as historically they were infantry men put on horses, and for this reason their horsemanship "was wobbly" and their swordsmanship was not of the highest order. In the first phase of Napoleonic Wars they served on the primary theatre of war, in Central Europe, charging in numerous battles. After 1807 majority of the dragoons served on secondary theatres of wars, Spain and Italy. Many of the regiments in Spain lacked uniforms, horses and equipment. But the dragoons were efficient troops. They fought a grim and deadly war of ambush and retaliation against the hostile Spaniards. They guarded communication lines and escorted convoys. They also participated in battles with the British and Spanish armies. Napoleon had problems to find the right horses for his dragoons. In 1805 approximately 6.000 of them were without mounts and were organised into 4 foot dragoon regiments. Their duty was to guard the artillery reserves and the baggage trains. The dragoons were armed with straight sabres and muskets. Their muskets were longer and had longer range of fire than light cavalry's carbines. While a light cavalryman's equipment included a carbine sling as a means of keeping his weapon readily available for use, the greater length of musket issued to dragoons made a sling impractical. Thus the stock of the musket was seated in a boot attached to the saddle, and its barrel restrained by a strap attached to the pommel. When the dragoons expected to go into action they drew sabres and muskets slung on their backs. In 1814 they gave away their long muskets for the infantry.

Cuirassiers

Cuirassiers are - together with Carabiniers - the only units in the Napoleonic era that still wear body armour. Their heavy cuirasses, combined with their large and strong mounts make them excellent shock cavalry, capable of punching a hole through the enemy line. However, their cuirasses do not protect them from cannon or musket fire, and they are quite a lot slower then light cavalry units.

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While other types of cavalry had their important roles to play, it was the cuirassiers, the descendants of the medieval knights, who could turn a battle with their sheer weight and brute force. They looked dangerous every time they ventured forward and the generals never employed them frivolously. When it came to hardware the cuirassiers were riding arsenals: body Armour, helmets, carbines, pistols and long straight sabres. The Russians called them zheleznye ludi (the iron men). There were 12 regiments of cuirassiers. They were considered as elite troops. The cuirassiers wore body Armour. It was uncomfortable to wear in summer and expensive. The cuirassiers were armed with straight long sabres and pistols. When in 1812 they received carbines they made considerable effort to avoid carrying them. The cuirassiers rode possibly on blacks, browns and dark bays. All horses and men were big and strong. They were the tanks of their time, at the trot and in dense formations they were the heavy front rank battle cavalry that could force a gap in the enemy line. In 1815 at Waterloo they were waisted at Wellington his squares, they needed infantry and artillery support, they got them to late.

Carabiniers

Just like Cuirassiers, the Carabiniers wear breastplates and ride strong horses. They have a slightly higher elite status, resulting in better morale and slightly better combat performance then the Cuirassiers.

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There were only two regiments of horse carabiniers, the 1er and 2e. In 1792 the French Ministry of War ordered that the carabiniers must always be chosen from seasoned and reliable soldiers. They were armed with straight sabres and pistols. In the ranks of carabiniers alongside the Frenchmen served also quite a few Belgians. In 1809 with the temporary absence of the Guard cavalry, the 1er Carabiniers formed Napoleon's escort. In 1809 Napoleon noticed that the carabiniers suffered badly in the hands of Austrian uhlans and ordered to give them Armour. Their helmet was of yellow copper, with iron chinstrap scales and a headband with the letter 'N' in front. The crest had a scarlet comb instead of the cuirassiers black horsehair. The cuirasses were almost identical in design to those worn by the cuirassiers, although they were covered with a sheet of brass (for officers red copper). The visual effect was astounding! In 1812 at Borodino the carabiniers repeatedly clashed with the Russian cuirassiers, hussars and dragoons. They fought with gusto until the end of battle when they were defeated by Russian cuirassiers of the guard. The campaign in Russia broke their backbone and they never were the same. Until the disastrous campaign in Russia in 1812 the carabiniers rode on big black horses. In 1805 the carabiniers received dragoon muskets. In 1810 their long straight sabres were replaced with slightly curved sabres (a la Montmorency). In 1812 the dragoon muskets were replaced with shorter cavalry carbines.

Mounted Guard Chasseurs

These light cavalry units have an average attack, but good defence and morale. It allows them to hold out longer against overwhelming odds then most other light cavalry.

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In 1796 Napoleon Bonaparte formed the Company of Guides to be his escort, later renamed to Chasseurs of Imperial Guard after Napoleons crowning in 1804. A squadron of Mamelukes in full oriental style, a remnant of Napoleon`s Egyptian campaign, was also attached to the Guard Chasseurs These men are well mounted and are resourceful, dashing, and very courageous. Napoleon described his Chasseurs de la Garde as "200 daredevils, well-mounted and brave." The Guard Chasseurs are armed with slightly curved sabres, pistols, and carbines. They wear expensive hussar-style outfits, being more flamboyant then the Horse Grenadiers, but were less precise in formation and movement, and lacked the discipline. They are the most known troop in the entire French army who nicknamed them "The Pet Children" (or rather the Spoiled Brats). Napoleon wore the uniform of colonel of this regiment. Historically in 1815 during the battle of Waterloo, the Guard Chasseurs met with the British and German cavalry (KGL). Repeatedly some of the chasseur squadrons rode up to within 300-400 paces of the British and German cavalry with their officers wearing tall, broad bearskin hats. On several occasions described by one English officer, "some of them rode up to us, challenging the officers of our [British] regiment to single combat. As they were much stronger, the regiment could not accept the honour ..."

Polish Guard Lancers

Like all lance armed units, they have a powerful charge, but they are vulnerable afterwards until they switched to sabres for close combat. The Polish Guard Lancers have a strong attack, and a very high morale.

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Renowned for their horsemanship, the Polish Guards lancers are one of only a few regiments that attained the perfection of changing formation at a gallop without losing its order. Napoleon was so impressed by the Polish nobles bearing and loyalty that he ordered the formation of a regiment of Polish light horse and attached them to his Imperial Guard. Just as their comrades in arms they are required to be landowners or the sons of landowners between the ages of 18 and 40 and were to furnish their own horse, uniform, equipment, and harness to a set pattern. They are issued with the lance, their national weapon, and are renowned for their skill with it in addition to their great bravery, disciplined charges, and great valour and loyalty to Napoleon's cause. They are also known to give no quarter and are feared by all (especially the British who considered them demons), even the Russian Cossacks have respect for them! Historically they are considered a legendary regiment! In 1808 Spain, the regiment charged Somosierra pass and captured four batteries that had been entrenched and supported by Spanish infantry in the hills. Napoleon was so impressed he proclaimed them "My Bravest cavalry!" He also ordered his Old Guard to present arms to the Poles as they rode by. One Polish lancer, Jordan, unsaddled 2 battle hardened veterans; dragoons of the Napoleon's Guard while Napoleon and Marshal Murat observed the duel. This regiment is one of two guard cavalry outfits never defeated by enemy's cavalry.

Mounted Guard Grenadiers

Or Guard Grenadiers ? Cheval are basically the Old Guard on horseback. Very high morale, with excellent fighting skills make them one of the most powerful cavalry units in the game. On top of that - just like the Old Guard - their sheer presence intimidates enemies (they were nicknamed "The Gods" for the amazing sight they made). But all this comes at a high price, and thus they should only be thrown in battle when it is certain that their presence will cause great deal of damage to the enemy, and preferably secure the outcome of the battle.

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In 1796 the Garde du Directoire was organised and one squadron of Horse Grenadiers was raised. Soon Napoleon enlarged the troop to two and then to four squadrons. The privates wore dark blue coats and collars, white lapels and tall boots. In 1797 they received tall fur caps. In 1804 the Consular Guard became Imperial Guard. For new candidates there were strict requirements: 176 cm tall, 10 years of service, minimum 4 campaigns and citation for bravery. The Horse Grenadiers became known for their austerity and haughty demeanour. The army nicknamed them "The Giants", "The Gods" or simply "The High Heels" (from their tall boots). In 1805 at Austerlitz they defeated Tsar's Guard cavalry. In 1807 at Eylau they stood under hellish fire from 60 Russian cannons, when their commander General Lepic noted some of his troopers ducking incoming shells. "Heads up, by God!" he cried "Those are bullets - not turds." Few moments later they charged against the Russians. The Horse Grenadiers were very devoted to the Emperor. In March 1814 a major of grenadiers was wounded at Craonne. He had his foot carried away by a cannon-ball and the surgeon had to amputate his leg. During the extremely painful operation "which he bore with great courage, the man called out "Vive l'Empereur!" and lost consciousness. The Guard Horse Grenadiers and the Polish Guard Lancers were the only two cavalry regiments of Napoleon's Guard never defeated by enemy's cavalry in combat. They rode big black horses and were armed with straight sabres, pistols and carbines.

[size=3]RUSSIAN CAVALRY[/size]

Russia possessed a vast force of cavalry, forming a greater percentage than that of most European armies. This stemmed partly from years of battle experience against the Ottomans (who used large bodies of excellent cavalry) and partly from the fact that much Russian terrain was suitable for the manoeuvre of large bodies of cavalry. The Russian horses were overall of good quality and they had some excellent officers and NCO`s. However Russian cavalry lacked training in massed cavalry formations compared to their French counterparts. The Guard, Cuirassiers and Hussars were among the best regiments in Russian cavalry. Russian Cossacks were a league on their own, probably the best irregular cavalry on the planet, masters in guerrilla tactics. Given the quality of mounts and personnel, if Russian commanders had been able to combine the cavalry in large formations, it might have become one of the most formidable forces in Europe.

Cossacks

At first glance the Cossacks appear as a very poor combat unit. And in fact they are, but they are also very cheap. This makes them an interesting unit for "suicide missions", such as getting them past enemy lines to attack unprotected artillery or even a general. Armed with lances, they pack a decent punch when charging, but are lousy in prolonged hand to hand combat against solid enemy units.

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Don Cossacks come from the Don Voisko Province near the lower and middle Don River, Russia. Don Cossacks are one of the biggest groups and heavily militarised and, like all other Cossacks, they are armed with the lance and curved sabres. Being tribal, they are commanded by their tribal chiefs, or Atamans, having little effect on organised disciplined or drill thus not much use against formed units. However they are superb horsemen and highly valued as scouts, raiders, and skirmishers at which they are at their element. Historically the Don Cossacks were formed in the second half of the 16th century largely by runaway peasants. By the end of the century they were granted certain privileges in exchange for frontier military service as Don Cossack Voisko.

Hussars

Hussars are very capable light cavalrymen riding fast horses. They have a good morale and are best at performing flanking manoeuvres or striking against vulnerable enemy units. They lack the charge power of lancers and heavier cavalry, so they aren't that good at attacking solid bodies of infantry and cavalry, but can still hold their own for a while.

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The Russian Hussars are light cavalry and armed with curved sabres and pistols. They are ideal for reconnaissance, screening, and raiding; in battle they are used to harass enemy skirmishers, overrunning cannon positions, and pursuing fleeing troops. Russian Hussars, as all other hussars, are renown for being brave, dashing, unruly, reckless, hard-drinking adventurers, always charging home with blind fury. The Russian generals sometimes employed them with heavier cavalry for support, making this a deadly combination. Historically Russian Hussars were used to loot and pillage and were also known (and feared) for their poor treatment of local civilians.

Uhlans

Ulhans are light/medium cavalry armed with a lance. This gives them a powerful charge with a good chance of killing their first opponent on impact. After the charge they switch to swords for close combat, but the time to do so makes them slightly vulnerable after the initial charge. Therefor they are best used against weakened or wavering enemies that can be routing by the sheer power of their charge.

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Russian Uhlans being light cavalry were mainly intended for service in the outposts, reconnaissance, support of heavy cavalry in action, and pursuit of the enemy. Armed with the lance, their main weapon, which they use with great skill. They are respected for being brave and well disciplined in the charge for they had inherited traditions of Polish Light Cavalry, but are of lesser quality compared to their Polish cousins. Historically the Poles were acknowledged to be the finest lancers in Europe and Russia, Prussia and Austria recruited their uhlan units from among the Polish and Lithuanian subjects. It was followed by an imitative creation of lancer regiments all across Western Europe (France, Germany and even the British got around to it after Napoleonic wars).

Dragoons

Dragoons are a sort of hybrid between light and heavy cavalry. They are capable of performing the tasks of both classes, but not as good as the true versions. They make up a good and affordable all-purpose cavalry arm.

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Russian Dragoons are armed with carbines or short musket called the dragon and with pallasches(long straight-sabres), like the heavier cavalry. However, they lack the armour of the heavies, thus they are classified as a medium cavalry. Dragoons are renown for their courage and dash in the charge but lack the shock impact of their heavier brothers, but do great against lesser cavalry. They are also ideal for scouting, raiding, and engaging enemy skirmishers. Historically A Russian Dragoon was traditionally a soldier trained to fight on foot, but transport himself on horseback. The Russian Dragoons were also cheaper to recruit and maintain than the notoriously expensive heavier regiments of horse (The Cuirassiers). Accordingly, this made the Czar employ more Dragoons then any other horse unit in the Russian armies.

Guard Cossacks

Guard Cossacks are a much more reliable and steadfast version of the casual Cossack units. They have a high morale and good defence, combined with a powerful charge.

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In 1796 the Don Voisko (host) were incorporated into the Russian Imperial Guards and became the Cossack Guards (or Leib Garde Cossack). Armed with pistols, swords, and an 8-foot long lance with a steel spearhead surmounting a steel ball to secure easy withdrawal of the point. These men are better disciplined and trained unlike the regular Cossack lancers, and are lead by officers who were their Ataman (leaders) and owed them complete loyalty. These men are brave and feared for their lack of mercy. They are also very resourceful as they lived off the land and foraged as they moved. They are tactically used for harassing enemy lines of communications and columns of march, perform fast-unexpected raids, ambushes, and reconnaissance. They were in their element when doing these tasks, but were of little practical value in pitched battles, as their impulsive and disorganised charges had almost no effect when confronted by steady infantry formations. Historically Napoleon once declared, "Cossacks are the best light troops among all that exist. If I had them in my army, I would go through all the world with them." Just like the French light cavalry, the Cossacks were the eyes and ears of the Russian Army who used hit and run tactics against enemy stragglers and supply columns.

Cuirassiers

Cuirassiers are - together with Carabiniers - the only units in the Napoleonic era that still wear body armour. Their heavy cuirasses, combined with their large and strong mounts make them excellent shock cavalry, capable of punching a hole through the enemy line. However, their cuirasses do not protect them from cannon or musket fire, and they are quite a lot slower then light cavalry units.

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The Russian cuirassiers are, as in almost all armies, the decisive arm used to break through an enemy utilising the sheer weight of man, horse, and armour; making them the heaviest shock troops. Russian Cuirassiers overall are brave and disciplined men dedicated to their officers and Czar! Each man and horse are big and strong, recruited from other cavalry regiments. The Russian Cuirassiers wore front and back black-enamel cuirasses (plates) and were armed with the straight-blade heavy-cavalry sabre to run down enemies with a thrust instead of the slash. Historically the Czar had two elite cuirassier regiments: the Emperor Cuirassiers and the St. George Cuirassiers who both captured French Eagles and drapeau from the second battalion of 24th French line infantry. Each man also carried a carbine and or a pair of pistols to guard the flanks when advancing to enemy lines.

Chevaliers Guard

These cavalry units are part of the Russian Guard, and are armoured with breastplates. They have a high morale, excellent defence, and make an excellent albeit expensive shock cavalry unit. Few cavalry units can match them on the battlefield.

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Russian Chevaliers Guards have the prestige from their position of being the Czars personal bodyguards. Like the heavy cavalry, the guard cavalry are equipped with the cuirasses and straight sabre. The Chevalier Guards are well disciplined and brave men, many of the Guards are veterans and recruited from the biggest and strongest men from other cavalry regiments, making them a formidable force to reckon with. They are the bravest of the brave in the Czars armies and are renowned fighters. Historically this unit was formed in 1796 during the reign of Czar Paul as Kavalergradski Korpus and in March 1800 became Kavalergradski Polk. Czar Alexander liked this regiment and often wore their uniform, for example, during his entry to Paris. The Czar's brother, Constantine (commander of the Imperial Guard) hated the Guard Cavalry since its officers were involved in the plot and killing of his father Czar Paul.

[size=3]SCREENSHOTS[/size]

Cossacks launch a surprise attack
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A big heavy cavalry melee
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Massive cavalry charge
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Advancing against enemy square...
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And charging it...
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Close combat
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Russian Cuirassiers cutting down French skirmishers
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Enjoy!

The Lordz

Comments
Zorrentos
Zorrentos - - 1,323 comments

Firts thought: WOW! Do u guys work for a gamedeveloper or something. This is one of the most promising mods i ever seen, seriously! Excellent work!

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Tharros
Tharros - - 39 comments

I've been watching this for a while. Very Impressing mod you have going, can't wait for its release. BTW nice models :D

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