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Just made a short video to show why marketing should be an essential part of your dev process. (My Steam financial report included.)

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Just made a short video to show why marketing should be an essential part of your dev process. (My Steam financial report included.)

Find Midsummer Night on Steam: Store.steampowered.com

Comments
Toolkitz

This hits hard for me. I once spent 2 and a half years working on a game, and just as you said, no marketing. Spent 2 years toiling on a game and it only got 8 downloads. By that point, that was 5 years of constant failure so I was used to it, but a lesson was learned: development alone is not enough. You can work on a game for decades on end and nobody could possibly know of it, especially now when the market is over saturated.

Though I am still a solo developer, I'm going to set aside my game come this summer and promote the heck out of it. I can't do both develop and market at the same time, it's so time consuming, but my best bet is to dedicate a period to development and another to promote it.

If you want my advice, try searching for a free consultation with a PR agent or marketer. I did just that, got a free consultation, and it opened my eyes. I know have a better understanding of what I did wrong and even though the advice was more or less vague, it gave me a starting point of where to start. If you do need a starting point, I would suggest you do that.

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EverlastingFantasy Author
EverlastingFantasy

2.5 yrs and 8 downloads - that's harsh. I'm into indie gamedev for 5 years too, and I can't say that I reached much success either.

I can't do development and marketing at the same time too: just can't switch that fast between deep immersion into the world of the game and active socializing.

Your approach, when you rotate dev and promotion intervals, seems quite workable. I'll give it a try. Thanks!

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wampa-stompa
wampa-stompa

it all depends on why you're doing it. if you're doing it for personal advancement and feeling of accomplishment and learning new things, then you succeeded with flying colors. if you're doing it for worthless surface-level accolades and followbacks that any spammer and obnoxious shallow narcissist can get, then...

it's all about priorities. i feel the uploader has their priorities backwards.

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EverlastingFantasy Author
EverlastingFantasy

Thanks wampa-stompa, I'll think about your words.

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LuisChaves
LuisChaves

Damn, that's harsh.

There's one thing I find to be true though, some games are more easily marketable than others. You'll always find examples of a particular gif of a certain game going viral, either due to the visuals or the innate interaction between game mechanics, but even in those cases there is always a grind behind it all. That said, get out on Twitter and market the crap out of whatever project you have in hands! Best wishes and good luck :D

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EverlastingFantasy Author
EverlastingFantasy

Thank you!)

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