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The first item in today's news is the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) Chevrolet 30cwt truck . The LRDG was an unorthodox British unit first created in 1940 to perform reconnaissance far behind enemy lines. Formed initially by a few relatively junior officers, and a small group of mainly New Zealander

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The first item in today's news is the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) Chevrolet 30cwt truck Rad-FH. The LRDG was an unorthodox British unit first created in 1940 to perform reconnaissance far behind enemy lines. Formed initially by a few relatively junior officers, and a small group of mainly New Zealander volunteers, the LRDG had to scrounge much of its equipment from the leavings of the rest of the Army.
The distinctive LRDG Chevy’s became emblematic of the LRDG’s ability to adopt any useful equipment were into their unusual arsenal. The very first of these were actually bought from a local Chevrolet dealer, some were borrowed from the Egyptian Army, and relatively few were acquired through regular army channels. All of these (like all later Chevys) had theircabs removed and were equipped with large sand tires. The version we present today is armed with Vickers and Lewis machine guns which will surely make Axis infantrymen go diving for cover.

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The LRDG’s transports were also fighting vehicles, which sported a variety of the best weapons available. First we have the water-cooled .303 inch (7.7 mm) machine gun produced by the Vickers company, originally for the British Army of WWI. The machine gun typically required a six to eight-man team to operate: one to fire, one to feed the ammunition, and the rest to help carry the weapon, its ammunition and spare parts. Although heavy it was extremely reliable, so long as there was enough water to cool it. The Vickers was modeled by The Jackal and Rad-FH. and skinned by Rad-FH.
Also visible on the Chevy Second is the Lewis .303 Mk. I, Model 1915. Although semi obsolete by the second world war, it was too heavy (although far lighter then the Vickers), to be useful as a light machine gun, and had been largely replaced in that role by the Bren. It
was mainly used mounted on vehicles, especially aircraft, but found a new home with the LRDG who respected its ruggedness and reliability.The Lewis was modeled and skinned by Rad-FH.
Last but not least we present the Webley Mk VI revolver made by McGibs. This 6 round .455 revolver is yet another weapon of World War 1 vintage. By World War II, it had been officially replaced by the Enfield No 2 Mk I revolver, but due to shortages, many Webleys
continued in service. The hard-hitting Webleys were especially popular with the New Zealand troops that formed the nucleus of the early LRDG. It was also manufactured by RSAF Enfield under the designation Pistol, Revolver, Webley, No 1 Mk VI.

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