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Tips for starting game development? (Forums : Development Banter : Tips for starting game development?) Locked
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Mar 10 2013, 8:56am Anchor

Hey, guys. I wanted to make games for a very long time actually, so I started learning python because a lot of people said that python is easy to learn and good for starting programming. I am making this thread to ask you what language and what tools I should learn using to make games that has pretty similar graphics to Pokemon Black and White.
I will be very grateful for your advices and tips. :)

Mar 10 2013, 9:19am Anchor

I'd go for HTML5 for a 2D game like these ones. :)

But it's not the really important thing. The crucial thing is to define your game, to think about the game design (not graphics! but gameplay, mechanics, etc). Then, any language could bring the project alive.

Mar 10 2013, 9:25am Anchor

At the moment I can't decide what to pick first C++ or Java because everybody recommends C++ and a lot of my favourite indie games was made with Java.

Mar 10 2013, 9:41am Anchor

Never choose c++, just never. My advise would be 1: learn html5 and JavaScript, these two together can lead to making some amazing web games and are easy to learn with a ton of resources. or 2: unity and c#, unity's uses a (unlike its version of JavaScript which is really unity script) c# like it gets used in other programs so learning it in unity can easily be used in other programs. 3: Scirra's construct engine is an amazing system that I tought me how to program and is easily accessible with a great community.

Unity3d.com

Scirra.com

W3schools.com

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Someone wrote:Her?
Mar 11 2013, 11:56am Anchor

What's the problem with C++? I mean there's a lot of modern games made with C+ and big numbers of engines uses it too.

Mar 11 2013, 12:52pm Anchor

C++ is harder to learn. If you're using an existing engine that uses C++ and you know programming that's one thing, but starting from scratch ain't easy.

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fla
fla
Mar 12 2013, 8:27am Anchor

Zoxtric, as you know Python, why don't you use a 2D Python engine (for example, pygame)?

Mar 12 2013, 11:33am Anchor

I am with figalot and TheHappyFriar, as great as C++ is- it's like starting to climb a mountain before tackling a hill- can be done but not too fun.

I think you could start with javascript and C# and get working with Unity in particular- (slowly becoming my mantra). figalot's post sums things up quite nicely.

This gives you some room to grow as you go along and you can tackle different kinds of games with Unity without having to "learn more". You will probably be able to get into C++ better later onwards after you are familiar with a programming language. After you learn how the backend works, you will be able to tackle the graphics side of things much better- and see what options you have from there.

Our experience with python has been that although it may be easier to learn/pick up- there are certain functions etc that are standard in other languages that are not present in python or that you have to code to perform- so keep this in mind. It is working for our purposes but it might still be a harder road than necessary when getting into to other languages and engines etc.

Edited by: A-Frique

Mar 12 2013, 5:23pm Anchor

I don't want to get in a strong engine because my laptop is kinda sh*t. So i'm looking engine like rpg maker but not for rpg.

Mar 13 2013, 4:15am Anchor

Since you are talking rpgmaker-ish, I would then probably recommend Game maker- they have come a long way from before.It should also be able to run on a "not high spec" laptop. It should also be able to achieve what you are looking for with some scripting (easy to pick up) as well as the inbuilt functions. If you work on the production value of the other things (art, UI etc) and scripting, your game should look more polished than what most have put out.

They also have a workshop on Steam you can get involved in. So take a look at it as an option.

Mar 13 2013, 8:39am Anchor

GameMaker is a great option if you're main interest is making the game side of things rather than learning programming. Although if you're starting from scratch it still isn't all bad.

Alternatively I'd recommend Unity.

Metalspy
Metalspy Basher of Drums
Mar 13 2013, 5:38pm Anchor

I don't understand what's wrong with starting with C++. I have started programming with C++ and it really is not that hard, you just need to take your time and read a book or tutorials on websites (for example cplusplus.com). Starting out with C++ enabled me to quickly understand and use concepts of other languages I have encountered later on. I must admit, I wanted to learn programming not only to develop games, but to write applications in general, so if you just 'want to make a game' instead of focus on programming then C++ might not be the right choice for you.

Java or C# are easier to learn and nearly as powerful for making games. And if you like a more of a 'drag and drop' approach instead of programming everything then I can recommend Unity (especially for3D games and GameMaker (especially for 2D games) as well.

Edited by: Metalspy

Niteshade
Niteshade 3D Artist and aspiring Technical Artist
Mar 15 2013, 2:39pm Anchor

Start with C++
It unlocks SO many more doors.
Learning javascript just in order to make games is the wrong path to take imo. It's not object oriented, and you are very limited to what you can create.
Arguing that it gives you the ability to make great web games is simply wrong: Most web games are based on either Java, Actionscript (Flash) or C# - not javascript. These languages are ALL object-oriented.

So learn C++, try out Gamemaker or Multimedia Fusion, make a few 2D games, then start learning math and 3D-engine programming and you are on your way. Also, if you want to code 3D-games you need to study math: vectors, matrices, linear algebra, trigonometry, calculus, probability, statistics. If you think you don't need math, read this:
Steve-yegge.blogspot.se

Even if you just want to code as a hobby, you got a long way to go. A LONG WAY. But we all started out somewhere. Even the greatest, most kick-ass engine-programmer at Crytek sucked at coding at one time in their life.

Edited by: Niteshade

Mar 16 2013, 3:37pm Anchor
Niteshade wrote:Start with C++
It unlocks SO many more doors.
Learning javascript just in order to make games is the wrong path to take imo. It's not object oriented, and you are very limited to what you can create.
Arguing that it gives you the ability to make great web games is simply wrong: Most web games are based on either Java, Actionscript (Flash) or C# - not javascript. These languages are ALL object-oriented.

So learn C++, try out Gamemaker or Multimedia Fusion, make a few 2D games, then start learning math and 3D-engine programming and you are on your way. Also, if you want to code 3D-games you need to study math: vectors, matrices, linear algebra, trigonometry, calculus, probability, statistics. If you think you don't need math, read this:

Even if you just want to code as a hobby, you got a long way to go. A LONG WAY. But we all started out somewhere. Even the greatest, most kick-ass engine-programmer at Crytek sucked at coding at one time in their life.


Thanks, that's a advice I was looking for.

Niteshade
Niteshade 3D Artist and aspiring Technical Artist
Mar 21 2013, 4:41pm Anchor
Zoxtric wrote:
Niteshade wrote:Start with C++
It unlocks SO many more doors.
Learning javascript just in order to make games is the wrong path to take imo. It's not object oriented, and you are very limited to what you can create.
Arguing that it gives you the ability to make great web games is simply wrong: Most web games are based on either Java, Actionscript (Flash) or C# - not javascript. These languages are ALL object-oriented.

So learn C++, try out Gamemaker or Multimedia Fusion, make a few 2D games, then start learning math and 3D-engine programming and you are on your way. Also, if you want to code 3D-games you need to study math: vectors, matrices, linear algebra, trigonometry, calculus, probability, statistics. If you think you don't need math, read this:

Even if you just want to code as a hobby, you got a long way to go. A LONG WAY. But we all started out somewhere. Even the greatest, most kick-ass engine-programmer at Crytek sucked at coding at one time in their life.


Thanks, that's a advice I was looking for.


Thanks.
Also: I see that you are young - that's great. I know coders who started programming when they were at your age - doing minor and/or boring stuff in C++, C#, java and so on - people who today work at companies such as DICE and Ubisoft Massive. They took some programming classes in high school, did some minor projects on their free time and went to the same 2-year school programme as I did (a vocational school for game development). The youngest of them got hired full-time by Ubisoft Massive at age 20, working on FarCry 3. So yea, everything is possible. Keep on dreaming and work hard!

Edited by: Niteshade

Mar 22 2013, 7:37am Anchor

Yeah C++ is not so bad as a language. With C++11 it's starting to get to java levels of easiness. The issue is when you want to get into things like cross compilation and optimization. That's where it get difficult or at the very least annoying. If you are making a 2D rpg for one engine that's not an issue then.

Plus there's plenty of great C++ libraries to make your life easier. In fact it's not so much the language you choose but the framework you build upon. If you are a beginner give SFML a look. It's quite easy to use.

Mar 22 2013, 8:28am Anchor
Niteshade wrote:So learn C++, try out Gamemaker or Multimedia Fusion, make a few 2D games, then start learning math and 3D-engine programming and you are on your way.

I was hoping someone would mention products like Gamemaker/Multimedia Fusion - they are a superb starting point for any budding game designer and although they appear rudimentary on the surface, they actually include important principles of programming and can produce some decent games.

Coding can be demoralising when you first start, especially if you don't see some decent tangible results, so WYSIWYG style game creators allow you to put something out quickly and easily, with immediate results, and that really drives you on to create bigger and better things.

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