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Concept Designer - Available (Forums : Recruiting & Resumes : Concept Designer - Available) Locked
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Aug 30 2012, 3:01pm Anchor

I am a budding conceptual artist. I can create designs for things such as: time period, weapons, objects, scenery, logos etc. At the moment I have not got much experience in creating game designs but it is something I am greatly interested in. If you are interested, contact me at: synyst5@gmail.com.

Edited by: Synys5

lancer611
lancer611 Professional Software Developer
Aug 30 2012, 3:23pm Anchor

Do you have any art you can post here to show the kinds of things you can do?

btw, the email you provided failed.

--

Controlling complexity is the essence of computer programming.  --Brian Kernigan
Game I was paid to make - Play.google.com

Aug 30 2012, 7:06pm Anchor

my bad, fixed the email now.
sword doodle thingy A sword with a bird detailing. Only drawing I could find, more of a doodle though. I didn't have access to a scanner at the time so I took a webcam picture of it which is why its blurry in places. I'm always improving though so not everything would be of this standard.

Sep 4 2012, 2:43am Anchor

No offense but you skills are a complete joke. No one in their right mind would want to have you as a concept artist when you drawing abilities is equivalent to that of an 8 year old.
Now I can understand that you have an interest in concept art, however, please understand that concept artists in the inudstry have had years of fundamentals training in painting and drawing. You want to be a concept artist? Be prepared to work your ass off just getting to the medium skill level that the job requires.
You will need to begin drawing from both life and photographs. Be prepared to spend the first 2-3 years doing nothing but studies, ranging from 5 minutes to 5 days, to 5 weeks. You will also need to read up on all the fundamental theories of art; value, color, composition, perspective, ect. Studying art history would also be a plus.
Do you think the pros go to where they are today by just doodling whatever they were thinking off the top of their head? No, there is no easy way to get good. You can't suddenly become super skilled after being inspired by some professionals concept art, it doesn't work that way. You get out what you put in.

The art world is one tuff competive SOB that will beat the shit out of you and than continue to stomp your lifeless corpse till you finally succumb to your own inadequacy. Get real, get motivated, and come up with a plan to become a better artist before you even think about concept art.

Sep 4 2012, 3:59am Anchor

I'll go in a different direction, and instead of crushing your dreams - then if you really mean it, and really want to be a conceptual designer and concept artist, it can be achieved - and if you push yourself, working on improvement 10+ hours a day - you can achieve this in a few years.

I began drawing in 2009 - so I have about 3 years of experience now. But I went all out. I spend all my money to take courses and masterclasses, and I spend half a year, drawing life-drawing. No buildings, no swords, nothing fun - just nudes.

So give it all your got. Find a suitable education, give up your real-life, time for gaming, etc. and you might be able to be there in 5 years time.

Sep 7 2012, 3:36pm Anchor

And really nice reply LineArt, its good to see people being really helpful.

Synys5 don't worry too much about your current state. As LineArt stated is good to practice everyday and always get better! In the project we are working on we have a rookie concept artist, she may not be awesome as industry professionals but she practices and learns all she can, she just gets better and better.

Remember that this is a indie scene and if you want to start a project although you don't have madskillz, you can aim to something that goes along to what you can do for now. For example, if you can't do realistic drawings yet, then you can aim to do a cartoon style videogame.

Hope this helped and good luck!

Sep 8 2012, 12:28pm Anchor

Good replies here! The truth is sometimes harsh, but it's what will make you want to fight the most!

Start a user at Conceptart.org and start a sketchbook there! Participate in ALL the challenges you can! Get a real sketchbook and bring it EVERYWHERE, draw in it whenever you get even a minute to spare! Do studies from life and from photos! Do personal work! Draw with both photoshop and traditional methods!

It is actually possible to become a pro after 2-3 years of very hard studying, as long as you always try to improve and learn! Good luck, and hope to see you work on Blizzard in the future! :)

--

I do Concept Art! Check out my profile for some of my artworks.

Sep 15 2012, 8:38am Anchor

hiensenberg you seem to forget the fact that moddb is not only a place for professional projects it is also where HEAPS of newbies start out, it wouldn't be hard for him to find a mod that suited to his skill level and everyone is here to learn anyway.

so in all honesty, stop being a dick

Sep 15 2012, 12:15pm Anchor

I would like to add up to Scottellison92's post.

It is very true, that this place is not only for professionals. In fact, the majority here, myself included are not professionals, but we are working our way to get there. To get experience, to increase and develop our network.

I began working on indies in 2009, I did not have a real purpose for drawing until then. Next to that, I also took classes and semesters to increase my skills, as well as I finally got accepted to art university. It took me 3 years to get there - but is all worth it.

I would still suggest to find books, on how to get started with drawing. It will mainly tell you, to draw fruit, simple shapes etc. It seems utterly boring, I know! But it is really the way to go. You need an understanding of shapes - and you won't get that, if you only draw complex things to start with. So while you draw the awesome stuff you like - also remember to mend your understanding of drawing - because that is very essential.

Once you get an understanding of what you are doing, and an understanding of design - then you should start looking for an indie project to work on.

Here you can find some sites for tips and hints. It is perhaps at a too high level for you yet - but you will get there. Draw everything around you. Teapots, fruit, furniture, people, plants, etc.

Wiki.polycount.com

And my personal favorite:
Autodestruct.com

Sep 27 2012, 1:21am Anchor

Perhaps I was a bit to harsh. I realize that moddb is not a website for just professionals. However, my intention was to scare people into taking mods more seriously because the vast majority of them fail. I told him how the industry is. I was hoping that that would give people a good idea of how hard they should work. I apologize for not being specific enough.
Drawing/painting is not a skill that improves by drawing/painting things from imagination. A strong understanding of art fundamentals is required, and that can only be achieved by essentially copying from life/photo directly to paper. There is no other way.

TheUnabridgedGamer
TheUnabridgedGamer It's been a long time...
Sep 27 2012, 8:33pm Anchor
Heisenberg wrote:Perhaps I was a bit to harsh. I realize that moddb is not a website for just professionals. However, my intention was to scare people into taking mods more seriously because the vast majority of them fail. I told him how the industry is. I was hoping that that would give people a good idea of how hard they should work. I apologize for not being specific enough.
Drawing/painting is not a skill that improves by drawing/painting things from imagination. A strong understanding of art fundamentals is required, and that can only be achieved by essentially copying from life/photo directly to paper. There is no other way.

...I'm sorry but you seem to see imagination as a separate thing from art. That's not how it works. Yes, you need to learn fundamentals in drawing and such, but without imagination the person isn't so much an artist -- more of a dispenser of 2D images that have no meaning beyond being requested.

Sep 28 2012, 12:53am Anchor

Imagination is an integral part of art, it is certainly not separate. However, what I'm trying to explain here is that the only way to improve you art skills is to draw from life/photographs, which essentially comes down to copying them if you want to get good at making things look realistic.
You then take that knowledge and apply it to things inside of your head.

You can do it the opposite way by drawing things only from your imagination, but doing so is a dead end in terms of improving your skills.
Think DeviantArt, well, about 95% of the anime/furry crap on that sight anyway.

Edited by: Heisenberg

TheUnabridgedGamer
TheUnabridgedGamer It's been a long time...
Sep 28 2012, 6:27pm Anchor
Heisenberg wrote:Imagination is an integral part of art, it is certainly not separate. However, what I'm trying to explain here is that the only way to improve you art skills is to draw from life/photographs, which essentially comes down to copying them if you want to get good at making things look realistic.
You then take that knowledge and apply it to things inside of your head.

You can do it the opposite way by drawing things only from your imagination, but doing so is a dead end in terms of improving your skills.
Think DeviantArt, well, about 95% of the anime/furry crap on that sight anyway.


...I have admittedly done a number of attempts at copying other images, using them as references, but often times I've also come up with some pieces that were purely out of my head, and if people's responses are to be believed, they came out pretty well even when similar copies that had similar aspects didn't come out as well. So I'd say it at least sometimes is a case by case basis. That's the problem and the upside of art -- very messy and hard to define.

Edited by: TheUnabridgedGamer

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