Volatile3D II is a game engine with modern graphic effects, interactive physics and many other features. Its renderer features realtime per-pixel lighting, parallax mapping, dynamic soft shadows, screen-space ambient occlusion, post-process filters, bezier curves and many other popular graphic techniques. Physics is based on Newton Game Dynamics engine.

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Volatile3D II game engine was started in 2008 and was considered to be a free alternate to id Tech 4 engine. It comprises some original features, for example, soft shadows, parallax mapping, screen-space ambient occlusion, sun shafts, soft particles and so on. We are always open to negotiations if you'd like to use it in your games.

Posted by XaeroX on Apr 24th, 2012

Dear community,
After several years of intense development we are proud to present a new 3D game engine, Volatile3D II. It was started in 2008 right after the first engine, Volatile3D, had been finished, and it was considered to be a free alternate to id Tech 4 engine. It might be not so fast, but comprises some original features, for example, soft shadows, parallax mapping, screen-space ambient occlusion, sun shafts, soft particles and so on. It might be not ideal, but we did our best to polish (well, to be honest) obsolete rendering techniques to produce a nice picture.

Certainly, this engine cannot compete with AAA monsters like UDK, Crysis and other. Furthermore, id Tech 4 is free and open-source nowadays. But we hope that this engine will also find its fans. Please note that proprietary license does not mean that you will never be able to use it. It does only mean that we don't expose the full source code to the public, but we are always open to negotiations if you'd like to use it in your game. Don't be ashamed to ask questions in comments or using a private messaging system if you must.

We plan to release a demo with several levels, but right now you can only get taste of screenshots and videos. Please don't judge it severely; note that the engine was programmed almost by one single amateur person at leisure time. :)

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D43m0n
D43m0n Jan 31 2014, 10:15am says:

You gotta be kidding?

"Please note that proprietary license does not mean that you will never be able to use it. It does only mean that we don't expose the full source code to the public"

Yes, because you copy-pasted from many GPL and BSD licensed projects. You fear the legal issues. You are single person, it is impossible for engine+toolkit+testing exist suddenly as a one-man-show for a proprietary engine.

This engine is paar to pointless, because you need either a corporation or a strong community to produce engine good enough to look modern. Keyword - fast development that is matched with actual projects using it.

A proprietary one man show - what are you actually planning to sell? As an indie engine, it is bad due to proprietary licensing that discourages any contribution.
As an proprietary engine whose purpose is to sell the engine - your development speed, lack of features and legal situation are of no benefit.

You also claim its cross-platform, I only see windows as a target. Is this your definition of crossplatform? Like NT5,6,6.1,6.2 and so on?

The only thing that you might learn from this engine is how to build engines. Otherwise, its crash-and-burn project. What finds place in "Leasure time" ends as a "Leasure time".

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XaeroX Author
XaeroX Feb 10 2014, 5:02am replied:

It was so funny to read these unfounded accusations. :)
Maybe one day the engine will be opened under GPL or other open-source terms, but I doubt you will appear then and present some apologizes. You would rather find something like "for ( int i = 0; i < N; ++i )" and say "Hey, guys, I saw this line in an open-source project, the author is a thief!!!" :))) There is a nice Russian proverb: "Pizdet' - ne meshki vorochat'"
To clarify things:
1) I put much attention to license terms. The engine uses many ideas from GPL projects, but not the code itself - which means that there are no (or almost no) legal issues. Most issues that exist are well-known (and described elsewhere), and I work on their elimination. If you find some license violations - please report them and I'll fix them ASAP. This is very important for me, because I personally hate people who steals the code and presents it as their own work.
2) Cross-platform means that engine supports Linux platfrom, although there are no projects released under it. The number of supported platforms has a tendency to grow, because I'm interested in mastering as many technologies as possible. But I don't claim anything until the work is complete.
3) I have no plans to sell either the engine or projects developed on it (e.g. Wolfram) at this moment. My work is completely non-commercial, however it can be changed in future, if it will be in popular demand.
4) I believe that a single person can develop a competitive engine, if the person it smart enough. However I don't assert that I'm such a person. But I do my best. :)

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Platforms
Windows, Linux
Company
Chain Studios
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Licence
Proprietary
Release Date
TBD
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